Assignments from 2018

In the next few months I’ll be adding details of the new Higher Physics Assignment with starter sheets.

February 2020

Well that didn’t happen did it? I’m on to it now! Until I can get properly up to date how about trying the experimental sheets in the document below which I’ve taken from Outcome 3s of the old Higher Course, for those who remember.

TopicStarter SheetAdditional Help
OUR DYNAMIC UNIVERSE
'g' AH 'g' a 2018
'g' BH 'g' b 2018
SlopesH g from slope 2020
PARTICLES AND WAVES
RefractionH Refraction A 2018
Critical AngleH Refraction B 2018
PlanckH h 2018
1/d2H 1over d^2 2018
Half value thicknessH Half Value Thickness 2020
ELECTRICITY
A.C. D.C. aH ACDC a 2018
A.C. D.C. bH ACDC b 2018
Internal Resistance & EMF A
Internal Resistance & EMF B
Capacitors A
Capacitors B
Capacitors C
Capacitors D
Wheatstone BridgeH Wheatstone 2018Wheatstone
Op AmpsOp amps
Signature

This summary is based on the updated information from the SQA. The first two links are for the candidate guide which is produced by the SQA and contains the information that students can access. This can be taken into the reporting stage of your assignment. It is important to check off what you have done at the end of your assignment with the marking instructions. Prior to this it would be a good idea to have gone through the Practical Skills Booklet.

The link below takes you to the full information document which is produced by the SQA. It is a current document. This cannot be taken into the Reporting stage of your assignment, although the document above can.

SQA Higher Physics Assignment.pdf

HigherCATPhysics

This assignment is worth 20 marks, contributing 20% to the overall marks for the course assessment. t applies to the assignment for Higher Physics.

SectionDescriptionMark
Title and structureAn informative title and a structure that can easily be followed.1
AimA description of the purpose of your investigation.1
Underlying physicsA description of the physics relevant to your aim, which shows your understanding.3
Data collection and handlingA brief description of an approach used to collect experimental data.1
Sufficient raw data from your experiment.1
Data from your experiment, including any mean and/or other derived values, presented in a table with headings and units.1
Numerical or graphical data relevant to your experiment obtained from an internet/literature source, or raw data relevant to your aim obtained from your second experiment.1
A citation for an internet/literature source and the reference listed later in the report.1
Graphical presentationThe axes have suitable scales.1
Suitable labels and units on the axes.1
All data points plotted accurately and, where appropriate, line or curve of best fit drawn.1
UncertaintiesScale reading uncertainties shown for all measurements and random uncertainty in measurements calculated.2
AnalysisAnalysis Discussion of experimental data.1
ConclusionA conclusion relating to your aim based on all the data in your report.1
EvaluationThree evaluative statements supported by justifications.3
Total20
Signature

Revision Review 1

Revision Reviews 1 word

Revision Reviews 1 pdf

Covering Units Prefixes and Scientific Notation and Uncertainties. Also scalars and vectors.

Review Answers, don’t cheat, it wont do anyone any good, especially you!

Review answers1_2 word

Review answers1_2 pdf

The above answers are only corrected to the first two review!

Electricity Resources

The 2018 part 1 Electricity Notes.

this is the pdf version of the document above covering a.c/ d.c, rms, resistance, circuits, and emf.  

And even hotter off the press part 2 Electricity Notes, sorry these have taken 6 months!


Remember

An LED is FORWARD biased. A photon is emitted when an electron falls from the conduction band into the valence band.

Power Matching (word)  Power Matching (pdf) Here is a task to show how to get the greatest power from your circuit. I’ve uploaded it as a pdf and word document.

Here are the answers in an excel spreadsheet, but don’t peek until you’ve completed your own graphs and table! power matching

semiconductors working 2

White Board Revision of Electricity 2

final-question-past-paper Here are the questions from the Revised Higher Physics Papers in topic order with the marking instructions. If you can’t read this I can upload as a pdf file, just ask!

 A graph of current against time for charging and discharging at different frequencies. Notice how at low frequencies (0-16s) the current can drop quite low, whereas at higher frequencies (16-26s) their is greater current overall.

Here is a nice introduction to semiconductors

Band Theory


TermInformation
ConductorsConductivity is the ability of materials to conduct charge carriers (electrons or positive holes) (all metals, semi metals like carbon-graphite, antimony and arsenic)
Insulators Materials that have very few charge carriers (free electrons or positive holes). (plastic, glass and wood)
Semi-conductors These materials lie between the extremes of good conductors and good insulators. They are crystalline materials that are insulators when pure but will conduct when an impurity is added and/or in response to light, heat, voltage, etc (silicon (Si), germanium (Ge), gallium arsenide (GaAs)
Band structure Electrons in an isolated atom occupy discrete energy levels. When atoms are close to each other these electrons can use the energy levels of their neighbours. When the atoms are all regularly arranged in a crystal lattice of a solid, the energy levels become grouped together in a band. This is a continuous range of allowed energies rather than a single level. There will also be groups of energies that are not allowed, what is known as a band gap. Similar to the energy levels of an individual atom, the electrons will fill the lower bands first. The fermi level gives a rough idea of which levels electrons will generally fill up to, but there will always be some electrons with individual energies above this
In a conductor: the highest occupied band, known as the conduction band, is not completely full. This allows the electrons to move in and out from neighbouring atoms and therefore conduct easily
In an insulator: the highest occupied band is full. This is called the valnce band, by analogy with the valence electrons of an individual atom. The first unfilled band above the valence band above the valence band is the conduction band. For an insulator the gap between the valence and conduction bands is large and at room temperature there is not enough energy available to move electrons from the valence band into the conduction band, where they would be able to contribute to conduction. Normally, there is almost no electrical conduction in an insulator. If the applied voltage is high enough (beyond the breakdown voltage) sufficient electrons can be lifted to the conduction band to allow current to flow. Often this flow of current causes permanent damage. Within a gas this voltage is often referred to as the striking voltage, particularly within the context of a fluorescent lamp since this is the voltage at which the gas will start to conduct and the lamp will light.
In a semi-conductor: the gap between the valence band and the conduction band is smaller, and at room temperature there is sufficient energy available to move some electrons from the valence band into the conduction band, allowing some conduction to take place. An increase in temperature increases the conductivity of the semiconductor as more electrons have enough energy to make the jump to the conduction band. This is the basis of an NTC thermistor. NTC stands for "negative temperature coefficient" (increased temperature means reduced resistance). This makes current increase so conductivity increases.
Optical properties of materials Electron bands also control the optical properties of materials. They explain why a hot solid can emit a continuous spectrum rather than a discrete spectrum as emitted by a hot gas. In the solid the atoms are close enough together to form continuous bands. The exact energies available in these bands also control at which frequencies a material will absorb or transmit and therefore what colour will appear
Bonding in semi-conductors The most commonly used semiconductors are silicon and germanium. Both these materials have a valency of 4 (they have 4 outer electrons available for bonding. In a pure crystal, each atom is bonded covalently to another 4 atoms: all of its outer electrons are bonded and therefore there are few free electrons available to conduct. This makes resistance very large. Such pure crystals are known as intrinsic semiconductors. The few electrons that are available come from imperfections in the crystal lattice and thermal ionisation due to heating. A higher temperature will thus result in more free electrons, increasing the conductivity and decreasing the resistance, as in a thermistor
Doping Semiconductor's electrical properties are dramatically changed by the addition of very small amounts of impurities. Once doped the semiconductors are known as extrinsic semiconductors. OR Doping a semiconductor involves growing impurities such as boron or arsenic into an intrinsic semiconductor such as silicon
An intrinsic semi-conductor is an undoped semiconductor
Fermi level Energy of latest occupied level in which the states below this energy are completely occupied and above it are completely unoccupied
N-type semi-conductors If an impurity such as arsenic with 5 outer electrons is present in the crystal lattice then 4 of its electrons will be used in bonding with the silicon. The 5th will be free to move about and conduct. Since the ability of the crystal to conduct is increased, the resistance of the semiconductor is therefore reduced. Because of the extra electrons present, the Fermi level is closer to the conduction band than in an intrinsic semiconductor. This type of conductor is called n - type, since most conduction is by the movement of free electrons (-ve)
P-type semi-conductors The semiconductor may also be doped with an element like Indium, which has 3 outer electrons. This produces a hole in the crystal lattice, where an electron is "missing". Because of this lack of electrons, the Fermi level is closer to the valence band than in an intrinsic semiconductor. An electron from the next atom can move into the hole created, as described previously. Conduction can thus take place by the movement of positive holes. Most conduction takes place by the movement of positively charged holes
Notes on doping The doping material cannot be added to the semiconductor crystal. It has to be grown into the lattice when the crystal is grown so that it becomes part of the atomic lattice.
ImpuritiesThe quantity of the impurity is extremely small (could be 1 atom in 1 million). If it were too large it would disturb the regular crystal lattice.
Semi-conductor ChargeOverall charge on semiconductors are still neutral
Minority charge carriersIn n - type and p - type there will always be small numbers of the other type of charge carrier, known as minority charge carriers, due to thermal ionisation.
p-n junctions When a semiconductor is grown so that 1 half is p-type and 1 half is n-type, the product is called a p-n junction and it functions as a diode. A diode is a discrete component that allows current to flow in one direction only.
@ T greater than Absolute ZeroAt temperatures other than absolute Zero kelvin, the electrons in the n-type and the holes in the p-type material will constantly
diffuse(particles will spread from high concentration regions to low concentration regions). Those near the junction will be able to diffuse across it.
Reverse-biased Cell connected negative end to p-type and positive end to n-type
Forward-biased Cell connected positive end to p-type and negative end to n-type.
Reverse biased - charge carriers When the p-side is attached to the negative side of a battery then the electrons at that side have more potential energy than previously. This has the effect of raising the bands on the p-side from where they were originally. We say it is reverse-biased. Almost no conduction can take place since the battery is trying to make electrons flow "up the slope" of the difference in conduction bands. The holes face a similar problem in flowing in the opposite direction. The tiny current that does flow is termed reverse leakage current and comes from the few electrons which have enough energy from the thermal ionisation to make it up the barrier.
Forward biased - charge carriers When the p-side is attached to the positive side of the battery then the electrons at that side have less potential energy than under no bias. This has the effect of lowering the bands on the p-side from where they were originally. We say it is forward biased. As the applied voltage approaches the switching voltage, more electrons will have sufficient energy to flow up the now smaller barrier and an appreciable current will be detected. Once the applied voltage reaches the set voltage there is no potential barrier and the p-n junction has almost no resistance, like a conductor.
In the junction region of a forward-biased LED electrons move from the conduction band to the valence band to emit photons.
The colour of light emitted from an LED depends on On the elements and relative quantities of the three constituent materials. The higher the recombination energy the higher the frequency of light.
The LED does not work in reverse bias since the charge carriers do not/can not travel across the junction towards each other so cannot recombine
Photodiode A p-n junction in a transparent coating will react to light in what is called the photovoltaic effect. Each individual photon that is incident on the junction has its energy absorbed, assuming the energy is larger than the band gap. In the p-type material this will create excess electrons in the conduction band and in the n-type material it will create excess holes in the valence band. Some of these charge carriers will then diffuse to the junction and be swept across the built-in electric field of the junction. The light has supplied energy to the circuit, enabling current to flow (it is the emf in the circuit). More intense light (more photons) will lead to more electron-hole pairs being produced and therefore a higher current. Current is proportional to light intensity.
Photodiode 2The incoming light provides energy for an electron within the valence band of the p-type to be removed from a positive hole and moved up to the conduction band in the n-type material. As this electron is moved up into the conduction band it has an increase in energy. Since EMF is the energy per coulomb of charge an EMF is generated.
Photovoltaic mode The p-n junction can supply power to a load (motor). Many photo-diodes connected together form a solar cell. This is described as photovoltaic mode.There is no bias applied to a solar cell and it acts like an LED in reverse. The increased movement of charge across a p-n junction can reduce resistance of component containing the junction .
Photoconductive mode When connected to a power supply a photodiode will act as a LDR. This is described as photoconductive mode. The LDR is connected in reverse bias, which leads to a large depletion region. When light hits the junction, electrons and holes are split apart. This leads to free charge carriers in the depletion region. The free charge carriers reduce overall resistance of the diode, allowing current to flow. Conductivity of diode is being changed.
ResistanceWhat is decrease by the addition of impurity atoms to a pure semiconductor(doping)
Applications of p-n junctions Photovoltaic cell /LED /Photoconductive mode(LDR)
What is photo-voltaic effect? A process in which a photovoltaic cell converts photons of light into electricity.
How light is produced at the p-n junction of an LED When the diode is forward biased the free electrons in the conduction band of the n-type material are given energy by the supply to overcome the energy barrier generated by the depletion layer at the junction. Once these electrons overcome the energy barrier they drop down from the conduction band to the valence band of the p-type material and combine with a positive hole in the valence band of the p-type material. As the electron drops between the bands it loses energy and emits this as light.
Explain band theoryUse band theory to explain how electrical conduction takes place in a pure semiconductor such as silicon. Your explanation should include the terms: electrons, valence band and conduction band. most/majority of electrons in valence band (½) or "fewer electrons in conduction band" (½) band gap is small electrons are excited to conduction band (½) charge can flow when electrons are in conduction band (½)
Electrons What charge carriers actually move across the p-n junction?

2016 Higher Question Paper

Some cars use LEDs in place of filament lamps. An LED is made from semiconductor material that has been doped with impurities to create a p-n junction. The diagram represents the band structure of an LED.

A voltage is applied across an LED so that it is forward biased and emits light.

Using band theory, explain how the LED emits light.

(Voltage applied causes) electrons to move towards conduction band of p-type/ away from n-type (towards the junction) (1)

Electrons move/ drop from conduction band to valence band (1)

Photon emitted (when electron drops) (1)

Anderson High School

Thanks to N. Hunter for these great notes from Anderson High.

This is the end of the course! Thanks for making the journey with me. Just revision to do now. All of those resources can be found in the REVISION section.

Worked Answers

For speed I will add some of the worked answer files here until I can produce an answer booklet, which I’ll do a.s.a.p.

capacitance tutorial answers

electric fields and resistors tutorials 2010

ac voltage tutorials answers corrected

electric fields and resistors tutorial answers

Signature

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol

Comments from the Workshop

Revision

Clicking on the link above will take you to the You Must Justify Questions that we didn’t have time for! Please look over this.

Flashcards

CfE Higher Revision Cards A4

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol

I’ve put together, with Mrs Mac’s help, a document with quantity, symbol, unit and unit symbol so that you know the meaning of the terms in the Relationships Sheet. It is in EXCEL so that you can sort it by course, quantity or symbol.

Quantity, Symbol, Units the excel sheet

Quantity, Symbol, Units a pdf sheet sorted by course and then alphabetical by quantity.

This is the same information in readily available Tablepress form. If you click on the Higher tab at the top it should sort by terms that you need in alphabetical order, or search for a term. Let me know if I’ve missed any.

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol Table for N5-AH

NHAPhysical Quantity symUnitUnit Abb.
5absorbed dose D gray Gy
5absorbed dose rate H (dot)gray per second gray per hour gray per year Gys-1 Gyh -1 Gyy-1
567acceleration a metre per second per second m s-2
567acceleration due to gravity g metre per second per second m s -2
5activity A becquerel Bq
567amplitude A metre m
567angle θ degree °
567area A square metre m 2
567average speedv (bar)metre per second m s-1
567average velocity v (bar)metre per second m s -1
567change of speed ∆v metre per second m s -1
567change of velocity ∆v metre per second m s-1
5count rate - counts per second (counts per minute) -
567current I ampere A
567displacement s metre m
567distance dmetre, light year m , ly
567distance, depth, height d or h metre m
5effective dose H sievert Sv
567electric charge Q coulomb C
567electric charge Q or q coulomb C
567electric current I ampere A
567energy E joule J
5equivalent dose H sievert Sv
5equivalent dose rate H (dot)sievert per second sievert per hour sievert per year Svs-1 Svh-1 Svy -1
567final velocity v metre per second m s-1
567force F newton N
567force, tension, upthrust, thrustF newton N
567frequency f hertz Hz
567gravitational field strength g newton per kilogram N kg-1
567gravitational potential energy Epjoule J
5half-life t1/2 second (minute, hour, day, year) s
56heat energy Eh joule J
567height, depth h metre m
567initial speed u metre per second m/s
567initial velocity u metre per second m s-1
567kinetic energy Ek joule J
567length l metre m
567mass m kilogram kg
5number of nuclei decayingN - -
567period T second s
567potential difference V volt V
567potential energy Ep joule J
567power P watt W
567pressure P or p pascal Pa
5radiation weighting factor wR- -
567radius r metre m
567resistance R ohm Ω
567specific heat capacity c joule per kilogram per degree Celsius Jkg-1°C -1
56specific latent heat l joule per kilogram Jkg-1
567speed of light in a vacuum c metre per second m s-1
567speed, final speed v metre per second ms -1
567speed, velocity, final velocity v metre per second m s-1
567supply voltage Vsvolt V
567temperature T degree Celsius °C
567temperature T kelvin K
567time t second s
567total resistance Rohm Ω
567voltage V volt V
567voltage, potential difference V volt V
567volume V cubic metre m3
567weight W newton N
567work done W or E Wjoule J
7angle θ radian rad
7angular acceleration aradian per second per second rad s-2
7angular displacement θ radian rad
7angular frequency ω radian per second rad s-1
7angular momentum L kilogram metre squared per second kg m2s -1
7angular velocity,
final angular velocity
ω radian per second rad s-1
7apparent brightnessbWatts per square metreWm-2
7back emfevolt V
67capacitance C farad F
7capacitive reactance Xcohm W
6critical angle θc degree °
density ρ kilogram per cubic metre kg m-3
7displacement s or x or y metre m
efficiency η - -
67electric field strength E newton per coulomb
volts per metre
N C-1
Vm-1
7electrical potential V volt V
67electromotive force (e.m.f) E or ε volt V
6energy level E1 , E2 , etcjoule J
feedback resistance Rfohm Ω
focal length of a lens f metre m
6frequency of source fs hertz Hz
67fringe separation ∆x metre m
67grating to screen distance D metre m
7gravitational potential U or V joule per kilogram J kg-1
half-value thickness T1/2 metre m
67impulse (∆p) newton second
kilogram metre per second
Ns
kgms-1
7induced e.m.f. E or ε volt V
7inductor reactanceXLohm W
7initial angular velocity ω oradian per second rad s-1
input energy E ijoule J
input power Piwatt W
input voltage V1 or V2 volt V
input voltage V ivolt V
6internal resistance r ohm Ω
67irradiance I watt per square metre W m-1
7luminoscityLWattW
7magnetic induction B tesla T
7moment of inertia I kilogram metre squared kg m2
67momentum p kilogram metre per second kg m s-1
6number of photons per second per cross sectional area N - -
number of turns on primary coil np- -
number of turns on secondary coil ns- -
6observed wavelengthλobservedmetrem
output energy Eo joule J
output power Powatt W
output voltage Vo volt V
6peak current Ipeak ampere A
6peak voltage V peak volt V
7phase angle Φ radian rad
67Planck’s constant h joule second Js
7polarising angle
(Brewster’s angle)
ipdegree ̊
power (of a lens) P dioptre D
power gain Pgain - -
7Power per unit areaWatts per square metreWm-2
primary current Ip ampere A
primary voltage Vpvolt V
7radial acceleration ar metre per second per second m s-2
6redshiftz--
67refractive index n - -
6relativistic lengthl'metrem
6relativistic timet'seconds
rest mass mo kilogram kg
6rest wavelengthλrestmetrem
6root mean square current I rmsampere A
6root mean square voltage Vrmsvolt V
7rotational kinetic energy Erotjoule J
7schwarzchild radiusrSchwarzchildmetrem
secondary current Is ampere A
secondary voltage Vsvolt V
7self-inductance L henry H
67slit separation d metre m
7tangential acceleration atmetre per second per second m s-2
6threshold frequency fohertz Hz
7time constanttseconds
7torque Τ newton metre Nm
7uncertainty in Energy∆E jouleJ
7uncertainty in momentum∆px kilogram metre per second kgms-1
7uncertainty in position∆x metre m
7uncertainty in time∆t seconds
6velocity of observer vometre per second m s-1
6velocity of source vsmetre per second m s-1
voltage gain - - -
voltage gain Ao or V gain - -
567wavelengthλmetrem
6work functionWjouleJ

 

Higher Past Papers

I’ve tried to avoid stepping on others toes, but alas, with my big feet I felt I needed to add the Physics Higher Past Papers and Marking Instructions (MI) as well as the PA/Exam/External / Course Reports.

These papers and marking instructions are reproduced to support SQA qualifications, please check the conditions of use and ensure they are not used for commercial benefit.

National Qualification Higher Physics Papers

Digital Paper
(spell)
Higher
Paper
YEARMIExam
Report
NO EXAMNO EXAM2020COVID-19FOR THE 1ST TIME IN ITS HISTORY
NH 20192019mi H 20192019 Report
NH SpecP1
NH Spec P2
SpecMI H P1
MI H P2
2018 DQPNH 20182018MI H 20182018 Report
2017 DQPNH 20172017MI H 20172017 Report
2016 DQPNH 20162016MI H 20162016 Report
2015 DQPNH 20152015MI H 20152015 Report
H S1 DQP
H S2 DQP
NH SpecSpecMI H Spec
Physics
marking
general
principles
READ
THIS!
MARK GUIDE

If you’d like to work through past papers by topic then Mr Davie has done all the hard work for you and has promised to keep this list up to date. He says

This document was created in order to make it easier to find past paper questions both for teachers and students. I will do my best to keep this document up to date and include new past paper questions as they become available. – C Davie Glenrothes High School.

http://bit.ly/HigherPhysics18

Below are the Revised Higher Past Papers, the content is very very similar to the new National (CfE) Higher, although the marks would be different. These were the last past papers with half marks!

Higher
Paper
YEARMIExam Feedback
H Rev 20152015MI Rev 20152015 Report
H Rev 20142014MI Rev 20142014 Report
H Rev 20132013MI Rev 2013
2013 Report
H Rev 20122012MI Rev 20122012 Report
H Rev SpecSpecimen
Paper
MI Rev Spec
READ
THIS
MARK GUIDE

These are the traditional Higher Past Papers (once also known as revised!) Remember some of this material is no longer on the syllabus, and some is relevant to National 5.

Higher
Paper
YEARMarking
Instructions
Exam
Feedback
H 20152015MI 20152015 Report
H 20142014MI 20142014 Report
H 20132013MI 20132013 Report
H 20122012MI 20122012 Report
H 20112011MI 20112011 Report
H 20102010MI 20102010 Report
H 20092009MI 20092009 Report
H 2008 2008MI 20082008 Report
H 20072007MI 20072007 Report
H 20062006MI 20062006 Report
H 20052005MI 20052005 Report
H 20042004MI 20042004 Report
H 20032003MI 20032003 Report
H 20022002MI 20022002 Report
H 20012001MI 2001
H 20002000MI 2000
H Rev Specimen QPSpecimenMI H Rev Specimen

Below is a work in progress of old papers. I am not sure if I’ve overlapped some but I’ll eventually get it all sorted!

Higher
Paper
YEARMarking
Instructions
Exam
Feedback
H 20152015MI 20152015 Report
H 20142014MI 20142014 Report
H 20132013MI 20132013 Report
H 20122012MI 20122012 Report
H 20112011MI 20112011 Report
H 20102010MI 20102010 Report
H 20092009MI 20092009 Report
H 2008 2008MI 20082008 Report
H 20072007MI 20072007 Report
H 20062006MI 20062006 Report
H 20052005MI 20052005 Report
H 20042004MI 20042004 Report
H 20032003MI 20032003 Report
H 20022002MI 20022002 Report
H 20012001MI 2001
H 20002000MI 2000

From National Parent Forum of Scotland This great little pdf file gives some ideas of suitable questions from the traditional Higher papers that are suitable for the new National Qualifications.

Thanks to Mr John Irvine for filling in most of the gaps in the Exam Reports, and to Mr Stuart Farmer for making it a full house, only a few left to fill. PLEASE can I recommend that both teachers and students READ the Report after tackling the past paper. The course reports give really good background and information about how candidates performed in the exam and what messages you should learn from them. Believe it or not, candidates often make the same mistakes every year! The reports are designed to help you learn from this.

Please also note that some of the National Higher content was once in the AH course, so it is worth checking these papers for some additional practice.

The papers pre-2000 can be found at http://mrmackenzie.co.uk/higher-revision/

I’ve added some info in here until Mr Mackenzie’s fab site is back up. Thanks to Mr Mallon, the originator of online resources!

Higher
Paper
YEARMarking
Instructions
1999H 1999 PI Solutions
H 1999 PII Solutions
1998H 1998 PI Solutions
H 1998 PII Solutions
1997H 1997 PI Solutions
H 1997 PII Solutions
1996H 1996 P1 Solutions
H 1996 PII solutions
1995H 1995 PI Solutions
H 1995 PII Solutions
1994H 1994 PI Solutions
H 1994 PII Solutions
1993H 1993 PI Solutions
H 1993 PII Solutions
1992H 1992 PI solutions
H 1992 PII Solutions
1991

All the best with your revision!

Signature