Rotational Motion Background Documents

Welcome to the 2021-22 AH Physics course. Another year, another journey together. I hope you feel that this site meets your requirements and that you can find the materials that you need.

Higher Revision

1 Jumper and building Answers

1b Mechanics Learning Outcomes 1 Questions

1b Mechanics Learning Outcomes 1 Answers

2a Flea soln

2b Linear motion

differentiation and integration in Linear Motion

1c homework on differentiation

1c differentiation answers

Tutorial Questions

RMA-726390 A set of Problem Solving Questions based on the original HSDU material by Andrew McGuigan, in pdf format

RMA 726390 A  set of Problem Solving Questions based on the original HSDU material by Andrew McGuigan, in word format

Rotational Motion

2 Circular Motion_2

3 uncertainties answers

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December 2020

Relationships

Using John Sharkey’s Flash Learning this video covers the required Virtual CfE Advanced Higher Physics Equations. NB there are some updates to equations since this material was produced.

Click on the image to open the Relationships Sheet.

Here is a little video to remind you of the relationships required at AH. See below for updates

Please note

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December 2020

Virtual AH

Using John Sharkey’s Flash Learning Virtual CfE Advanced Higher Physics these videos cover all of the unit Rotational Motion and Astrophysics. Note there have been a few changes to the Course Specifications since these were produced.

Here are some of the recordings from Virtual Flash Learning for the Rotational Motion Section. Turn off the volume if you dont want to hear from me.

AH Kinematic Relationships using the Virtual Physics

Angular Momentum-

This one has audio but you can switch it off.

Angular Motion

Rotational Dynamics

Gravitation

Space and Time

Stellar Physics

Note in the Stellar Physics video the equation for Apparent Brightness has now been changed see below

Apparent Brightness where d is the distance from the star to Earth
The thermal energy radiated by a blackbody radiator per second per unit area. This only works for Black Bodies, for other bodies the emissivity must be included. You will only be asked about black bodies in your AH exam.

Luminoscity, where r is the radius of the star.
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December 2020

Quanta & Waves Resources

Resources: Notes and video (flash learning AH CfE Virtual Physics)

Read the notes, watch the video and answer the questions below, in a way that makes them form a good note about the subject.

  1. What three pieces of key evidence didn’t fit with classical physics?
  2. In 1911 Rutherford put forward his model of the atom, a) State the important features of this model b) What provides the centripetal force for the electrons in this model?
  3. Describe black body radiation.
  4. State two changes with the black body radiation curve as temperature increases.
  5. Describe the UV catastrophe.
  6. Who helped solve the UV catastrophe and in what ways?
  7. Which piece of the photoelectric effect experiment demonstrates that energy is not transferred as waves?
  8. From the photoelectric effect state the link between the energy of the photon and a) the frequency of the radiation, b) the wavelength
  9. What did Bohr postulate about angular momentum?
  10. State the formula for angular momentum in Bohr’s model of the atom, (define each term)
  11. State the limits for the Bohr model of the atom
  12. Explain the observation made by GP Thomson in 1920 which led to further debate on the issue.
  13. What did de Broglie imply was the link between electrons as waves and particles?
  14. Explain the confusion caused when looking at the double slit experiment with single particles.
  15. What happens when you observe an electron passing through the slit?
  16. What two quantities cannot be measured together with much certainty and why?
John Sharkey’s Virtual Physics CfE AH Particles from Space
John Sharkey’ SHMs Virtual Physics CfE AH
John Sharkey’s Waves Virtual Physics CfE AH
This is additional support for travelling waves

Here is a nice little video on Standing Waves. Standing waves are formed when a wave interferes with its reflection to produce nodes and antinodes.

…..and here is the explanation for the standing wave video

John Sharkey’s Interference Virtual Physics CfE AH
John Sharkey’s CfE AH Polarisation

Resources

Below are some accumulated resources. Thanks to all of those who produced them.

ah-quanta-summary notes problems-2015 Thanks to RGC for these notes

quanta-and-waves-student-booklet-i-ror Thanks to Mr Orr for these.

Quanta and Waves Student booklet I ROR pdf version of the above

4.2 Energy changes during simple harmonic motion

ah waves summary notes and problems 2013 RGC notes thanks for these

PhysicsQuantaandWaves_tcm4-726389 Andrew McGuigan Numerical Questions

ah quanta summary notes and problems 2015 LA

ah quanta tutorial solutions 2015

ah uncertainties experiments 2013

ah waves summary notes and problems 2013

ah waves tutorial solutions 2013

Quanta

glossary-of-terms-table2

stellar  physics pdf       stellar physics.doc

Properties_of_stars_and_stellar_evolution

electrons-exhibit-both-wave

cosmic-rays A quick research task on cosmic rays.

cosmic-rays-answers The answers to the sheet above.

solar-wind-magnetosphere

solar-wind-magnetosphere-answers

Scientist think that the Earth is due a “Magnetic Flip” Research this starting at the link below and then answer the AH Revised question on this from the 2015 Paper Q11

Here is a Radio 4 programme talking about the consequences of a polar flip. If you want to view further programmes click on the link below.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/curious case of Rutherford and Fry

https://www.physics.org/facts/frog-magnetic-field.asp

soho_fact_sheet

The number of sunspots is an indication of solar activity. Research this and then complete the AH Revised 2013 paper Q6.

quantum-mechanics

unit-2-part-1-quanta-notes

Quantum Tunnelling – strange but true

Background

What is the Uncertainty Principle? Minute Physics

Quantum Tunnelling is the process by which a particle gets across a barrier that it cannot classically pass.

It is related to wave-particle duality in that it is a result of the wave nature of a particle.

The probability of the particles getting through the barrier drops exponentially with the thickness of the barrier.

“>What is Quantum Tunnelling? Minute Physics

How to walk through walls- Quantum Tunnelling

Is Quantum Tunnelling faster than the speed of light?

Quantum Entanglement

 

 

Waves

shm-intro

unit-2-part-2-waves-notes

shm INTRO

PhysicsQuantaandWaves_tcm4-726389

Tutorial AH Revised Booklet v2

AH (SHM)

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December 2020


Week 1: Get to know the Course

Focus

  1. Get to know the course, content and expectations
  2. Begin to understand Uncertainties, and how to quantify them
  3. Revise Higher work
  4. Get into a routine of expectations, good work routine, how to self study, how to seek help
  5. Review calculus and its role in AH physics.
  6. Begin to get to grips with section 1 in the compendium.
  7. Begin to investigate a possible project idea.

Success Criteria

  1. Score 90% in the quick quiz (If I can find out how to make them up!)
  2. Have a good understanding of your part in obtaining the best grade you can
  3. Start to make notes on compendium section 1.
  4. Have set up a learning routine for Project, Learning, Notes etc.

TASKS

NB You do not have to do these in any particular order, although it would be easier to do some before the others!

  1. If possible download and print off the AH Compendium, relationships sheet and data sheet. If not can you download it in an editable form online
  2. Log into Scholar and check it out. I hope to be using it this year, so I’ll need a refresher too. The notes and questions can be a little awkward but it is a good background. Note there is a SCHOLAR introduction session on 6th May that I recommend you signing up for. Log in through your GLOW LAUNCHPAD
  3. Check out Mrsphysics AH section and familiarise yourself as to where to find things.
  4. Check other websites in the list that I am trying to make up on RESOURCES. I am trying to match this to the compendium but the IoP have been working on this for you too. https://mrmackenzie.co.uk/advanced-higher/
  5. Watch the video on Mr Mitchell’s introduction to AH Physics
  6. Watch the video on Mr Mitchell’s Units, Prefixes and Scientific Notation
  7. Watch the video on Mr Mitchell’s Significant Figures
  8. Watch the video on Mr Mitchell’s Greek Letters
  9. and one more watch the video on Mr Mitchell’s Use of Calculators
  10. Read the course content (course support notes)and the project and see if any of the potential projects takes your fancy.
  11. Get something to make notes in or on, if you don’t have access to a source of paper let me know by GLOW email. You need a jotter for notes, something for tutorials and a daybook for your project.
  12. Complete the Higher questions and see how many you can do without using your book.
  13. Read the document on Calculus (pdf) / Calculus (word) and work through that. There are homework questions for you to tackle in there. You will be marking these next week.

http://mrmackenzie.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/ah_cphy_unit1.pdf

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April 2020

Project 2019+

An adaptation of Tom Balanowski’s notes by Mr Bailey. This is a useful guide to teachers preparing students for their AH Physics Project. PLANNING is the KEY.

<a href=

If you are not familiar with Excel can I recommend you spending a bit of time looking over the post in the BGE section (link below). I’ll add a further advanced part for you below.

Other packages are available and some are more robust such as R but I am not sure whether I will introduce that to you now.

https://www.mrsphysics.co.uk/advanced/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Hookes-Law-Table-in-Excel.mp4

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June 2020

Plotting graphs in Excel is coming this way soon!

Changes in AH from 2019

Firstly from me

check out the prefixes you need. Notice anything different?

Yep, know your femto from you nano, and your Peta from your Tera!

I am grateful to Ms K Ward from George Heriot’s School for trawling through the new and old curriculum and recording the changes. Thanks also for allowing me to reproduce it here.

Assessment

Old assessment: 100 mark question paper, 30 mark project, plus pass all the units

New assessment: 155 mark question paper, scaled to 120, 40 mark project (hence project is 25%)

Changes to content:

The content is no longer divided into ‘mandatory course key areas’, ‘suggested learning activities’, and ‘exemplification of key areas’.  There is simply a list of the course contents.

Where the wording has changed but I don’t see any real difference, I have said ‘no change’. 

RMA

Kinematic relationships – no change

Angular motion – derivation of centripetal acceleration equation is gone

Rotational dynamics – no change

Gravitation

–       ‘Conversion between astronomical units (AU) and metres and between light-years (ly) and metres’ – is new

–       ‘Consideration of the energy required by a satellite to move from one orbit to another’ – is gone

General Relativity

–       ‘Knowledge that the escape velocity from the event horizon of a black hole is equal to the speed of light’ – is new

Stellar physics
has changed to

Specific example of  a p-p chain is now given

Hertzprung-Russell section is rewritten more clearly.

Quanta and Waves

Introduction to quantum theory – no change

Particles from space

–       ‘Knowledge of the interaction of the solar wind with Earth’s magnetic field’ – is gone.  New document only mentions composition of solar wind.  Helical motion of charged particles is still there though, so it might not really matter.

Simple harmonic motion (SHM)– no change

Waves – no change

Interference

Relationship for interference due to division of amplitude is now specified, 
opd=mλ or (m+1/2) λ where m=0,1,2…

Polarisation – no change

Electromagnetism

Fields

–       ‘Knowledge of Millikan’s experimental method for determining the charge on an electron’ – this was in ‘exemplification’ before but is now specifically required knowledge

–       ‘Comparison of gravitational, electrostatic, magnetic, and nuclear forces in terms of their relative strength and range’ – the words in bold are new

Circuits

–       ‘Knowledge that, in an RC circuit, an uncharged capacitor can be considered to be fully

charged after a time approximately equal to 5τ.  Knowledge that, in an RC circuit, a fully charged capacitor can be considered to be fully discharged after a time approximately equal to 5τ.’ – is new

Electromagnetic radiation– no change

Uncertainties

Knowledge and use of appropriate units, prefixes and scientific notation
Data analysis

–       ‘Absolute uncertainty should normally be rounded to one significant figure. In some instances, a second significant figure may be retained.’ – the words in bold are new.  It does not specify the instances in which a second figure may be retained.

–       ‘Knowledge that, when uncertainties in a single measurement are combined, an uncertainty can be ignored if it is less than one third of one of the other uncertainties in the measurement’ – is new

–       ‘Knowledge that, when uncertainties in measured values are combined, a fractional/percentage uncertainty in a measured value can be ignored if it is less than one third of the fractional/percentage uncertainty in another measured value’ – is new

–       The equation for the uncertainty in a value raised to a power is now given:

Evaluation and significance of experimental uncertainties

–       This short section is new

SHM Practicals

The AH today were working in 3 groups to research via practicals and notes about SHM. The task is given below. Well done to Morford and Hodgson who created the following from their practical, with very little assistance. Their results were so good I thought I’d share them.

Mr Morford wrote
“These graphs are from our recent experiment to determine the effect of damping on an oscillating mass. A mass was hung from a spring over an Alba Ranger ultrasound device. We then analysed our measurements using excel and graphed our results to find the decay due to damping.”

Morford & Hodgson (2019)
Check out the great phase lag and the obvious proof of SHM showing a is proportional to -ky
The period isn’t constant because the spring started moving with horizontal motion but the amplitude certainly deteriorated
I’ll need to check this….but it looks good!

This was the task for the class and my thanks to the IoP for their Practical Physics lessons and to the other places referenced for some great practical techniques. I will neaten this post later, but I promised Morford and Hodgson that I would post tonight!

Hopefully I can collate the rest of the groups information soon.

By the end of the lesson you should……

  • You to have the spring constant for two of the springs by two different methods.
  • A graph of d against t, v against t, and a against t
  • A value of the period of spring for various masses
  • Discovered the effect of amplitude on the period Found the effect of damping (so find out what that is)

https://www.webassign.net/question_assets/ncsucalcphysmechl3/lab_7_1/manual.html

https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergraduate/preparing-for-university/stem/Physics/stem-legacy-SHM.aspx

https://www.cyberphysics.co.uk/topics/shm/springs.htm

http://practicalphysics.org/investigating-mass-spring-oscillator.html

2020

Despite Covid-19 the intrepid AH students have been showing damping with a pendulum bob and tracker. The original movie has still to be analysed by our friends from Annan

This is Courault and Douglas with bob skimming the water and you can see some damping on the graph. Note the period remains constant but the amplitude, and hence energy is reduced. Well done Courault and Douglas, imortalised in your tracker movie!
This is Patterson and Pritchards attempt with bob fully immersed as it goes through its swing. You can see bob is far more damped! I think Pritchard was a little lazy with his identification of the edge of bob as that period is definitely changing! Compare this damping with the previous one. Well done to both of you!

Now if we can add Atwal, Burns, Carson and Morrin’s tracker we can have a full set for 2020 and you can look back with fondness at your time in AH, despite all the distancing.

Investigating a mass-on-spring oscillator

Demonstration

A mass suspended on a spring will oscillate after being displaced. The period of oscillation is affected by the amount of mass and the stiffness of the spring. This experiment allows the period, displacement, velocity and acceleration to be investigated by datalogging the output from a motion sensor. It is an example of simple harmonic motion.


Analysis 
Measurement of period 
Period and Amplitude Observe that the period appears to be independent of amplitude. 
 
Effect of mass 
A straight line is the usual result, showing that the period squared is proportional to the mass. 
 
Velocity and acceleration 
A plot of the resulting data shows a ‘velocity vs. time’ graph. Note that the new graph is also sinusoidal. However, compared with the ‘distance vs. time’ graph, there is a phase difference – the velocity is a maximum when the displacement is zero, and vice versa. 
 
A similar gradient calculation based on the ‘velocity vs. time’ graph yields an ‘acceleration vs. time’ graph. Comparing this with the original ‘distance vs. time’ graph shows a phase difference of 180°. This indicates that the acceleration is always opposite in direction to the displacement. Teaching notes

Aim: To find the force constant of a helical spring by plotting a graph between load and extension.

Aim: To find the effect of damping on an oscillating spring

Aim: To find the effect of mass on an oscillating spring

Aim: To use the formula for an oscillating spring to find m or k etc

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December 2020