Revision Materials for the CfE Higher Physics Course

Get organised! The most important advice I can give you for this year.

Monthly Calendar Here is a  monthly calendar to help you plan your study and life during this year. Most people find their Higher year the hardest they’ll ever do. It will pass quicker than you imagine, so don’t leave things until the last minute.

Weekly Planner Here is a weekly planner if you prefer this layout to your homework planner.

and if you are just starting out and want to know about how and why to learn check out Mr Burke’s site https://sciencewithmrb.wordpress.com/science-of-learning/

Here is a 10 week revision plan from Mr Kennedy- thanks

Adjust to your own order.

New for 2022 KNOWLEDGE ORGANISERS

Teamwork by Mr Stewart (Berwickshire HS) and I. He designed and made them and I tweaked them. Thanks Mr Stewart they’re ace!

Uncertainties

Contains UPSN, OEQ, Uncertainties and is 4 pages

Our Dynamic Universe

Thanks Mr R Stewart!

Particles and Waves

Link working!

Particles from the Particles and Waves section- 4 pages+ references (don’t print that one!)
These currently are 5 draft pages

Parrot sheets

Whilst you are waiting for the Knowledge organisers (I’m on the case, but writing a prelim for you!) here is a fab parrot sheet. Thank C Forster, and I hope you don’t mind that I’ve made a few of changes- obviously you do as my changes haven’t saved! No time tonight but I’ll try to do this tomorrow.

URGH!

Everyone loves a Mindmap!

Mr Risbridger comes to the rescue again. After the excellent N5 Mind maps he’s started on some Higher ones. Thanks Sir!

ODU Mindmaps

Motion, Equations and Graphs
Force, Energy and Power
Collisions, Explosions and Impulse
Gravitation and Special Relativity
The Expanding Universe

Particles and Waves Mindmaps

The Standard Model
Forces on Charged Particles
Wave Particle Duality
Nuclear Reactions
Inverse Square Law
Spectra

Electricity Mindmaps

Monitoring and measuring A.C.
Current, pd, power and resistance
EMF and internal resistance
Capacitors

Semiconductors
More Resources

higher revision cards

Revision Techniques[1]  Ideas about revision techniques

What type of Learner are you? I would expect by this stage you have a fair idea, but just in case it has passed you by go through some of the documents below. You might need a friend to work through this with you.

Instructions_for_VAK_test

Inventory of Learning styles

learning style Learning_style_questionnaire

learningstylehandout

VAK_assessment_sheet_for_students VAK_Powerpoint

Below are a few pointers on how to answer exam questions.

Sketch Graphs

Here is a document for you to mark to see what you would consider the marking scheme for each diagram. NB This is the marking scheme for the unrevised Higher, so although the ideas are the same the mark scheme will be slightly different.

Sketch Graphs pptx

The power point that explains the graph marking scheme above.

Must Justify

Work on how to answer questions that include justify statement.

HIGHER WORKSHOP CfE 2018 Final

Updated for the 2018 exam on 8th May 2018

CfE Higher Physics – Unit by Unit – Past Paper Questions

Some hints to CfE type questions

Hope the revision goes well, don’t forget to take some regular breaks and get some exercise, including fresh air and a walk or a run. You better remind me too. I only make about 5k steps a day! All the best, it was lovely sharing this journey with you.
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Mrs Physics January 2022


More Revision Resources

Came across these lovely, although large font, flashcards. They have the prefix name Woodmill, so I assume they were made by someone from Woodmill High School. If you reveal yourself I’ll thank you personally. Print double sided on A4 to get ready made flashcards. If that is not possible just copy them out!

Thanks to Mr Dawson from Wallace Hall Academy in D&G for these great resources. Use them well!

DYNAMICS

Particles

Signature
October 2021

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol

Comments from the Workshop

Revision

Clicking on the link above will take you to the You Must Justify Questions that we didn’t have time for! Please look over this.

Flashcards

CfE Higher Revision Cards A4

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol

I’ve put together, with Mrs Mac’s help, a document with quantity, symbol, unit and unit symbol so that you know the meaning of the terms in the Relationships Sheet. It is in EXCEL so that you can sort it by course, quantity or symbol.

Quantity, Symbol, Units the excel sheet

Quantity, Symbol, Units a pdf sheet sorted by course and then alphabetical by quantity.

This is the same information in readily available Tablepress form. If you click on the Higher tab at the top it should sort by terms that you need in alphabetical order, or search for a term. Let me know if I’ve missed any.

Quantity, Symbol, Unit, Unit Symbol Table for N5-AH

NHAPhysical Quantity symUnitUnit Abb.
5absorbed dose D gray Gy
5absorbed dose rate H (dot)gray per second gray per hour gray per year Gys-1 Gyh -1 Gyy-1
567acceleration a metre per second per second m s-2
567acceleration due to gravity g metre per second per second m s -2
5activity A becquerel Bq
567amplitude A metre m
567angle θ degree °
567area A square metre m 2
567average speedv (bar)metre per second m s-1
567average velocity v (bar)metre per second m s -1
567change of speed ∆v metre per second m s -1
567change of velocity ∆v metre per second m s-1
5count rate - counts per second (counts per minute) -
567current I ampere A
567displacement s metre m
567distance dmetre, light year m , ly
567distance, depth, height d or h metre m
5effective dose H sievert Sv
567electric charge Q coulomb C
567electric charge Q or q coulomb C
567electric current I ampere A
567energy E joule J
5equivalent dose H sievert Sv
5equivalent dose rate H (dot)sievert per second sievert per hour sievert per year Svs-1 Svh-1 Svy -1
567final velocity v metre per second m s-1
567force F newton N
567force, tension, upthrust, thrustF newton N
567frequency f hertz Hz
567gravitational field strength g newton per kilogram N kg-1
567gravitational potential energy Epjoule J
5half-life t1/2 second (minute, hour, day, year) s
56heat energy Eh joule J
567height, depth h metre m
567initial speed u metre per second m/s
567initial velocity u metre per second m s-1
567kinetic energy Ek joule J
567length l metre m
567mass m kilogram kg
5number of nuclei decayingN - -
567period T second s
567potential difference V volt V
567potential energy Ep joule J
567power P watt W
567pressure P or p pascal Pa
5radiation weighting factor wR- -
567radius r metre m
567resistance R ohm Ω
567specific heat capacity c joule per kilogram per degree Celsius Jkg-1°C -1
56specific latent heat l joule per kilogram Jkg-1
567speed of light in a vacuum c metre per second m s-1
567speed, final speed v metre per second ms -1
567speed, velocity, final velocity v metre per second m s-1
567supply voltage Vsvolt V
567temperature T degree Celsius °C
567temperature T kelvin K
567time t second s
567total resistance Rohm Ω
567voltage V volt V
567voltage, potential difference V volt V
567volume V cubic metre m3
567weight W newton N
567work done W or E Wjoule J
7angle θ radian rad
7angular acceleration aradian per second per second rad s-2
7angular displacement θ radian rad
7angular frequency ω radian per second rad s-1
7angular momentum L kilogram metre squared per second kg m2s -1
7angular velocity,
final angular velocity
ω radian per second rad s-1
7apparent brightnessbWatts per square metreWm-2
7back emfevolt V
67capacitance C farad F
7capacitive reactance Xcohm W
6critical angle θc degree °
density ρ kilogram per cubic metre kg m-3
7displacement s or x or y metre m
efficiency η - -
67electric field strength E newton per coulomb
volts per metre
N C-1
Vm-1
7electrical potential V volt V
67electromotive force (e.m.f) E or ε volt V
6energy level E1 , E2 , etcjoule J
feedback resistance Rfohm Ω
focal length of a lens f metre m
6frequency of source fs hertz Hz
67fringe separation ∆x metre m
67grating to screen distance D metre m
7gravitational potential U or V joule per kilogram J kg-1
half-value thickness T1/2 metre m
67impulse (∆p) newton second
kilogram metre per second
Ns
kgms-1
7induced e.m.f. E or ε volt V
7inductor reactanceXLohm W
7initial angular velocity ω oradian per second rad s-1
input energy E ijoule J
input power Piwatt W
input voltage V1 or V2 volt V
input voltage V ivolt V
6internal resistance r ohm Ω
67irradiance I watt per square metre W m-1
7luminoscityLWattW
7magnetic induction B tesla T
7moment of inertia I kilogram metre squared kg m2
67momentum p kilogram metre per second kg m s-1
6number of photons per second per cross sectional area N - -
number of turns on primary coil np- -
number of turns on secondary coil ns- -
6observed wavelengthλobservedmetrem
output energy Eo joule J
output power Powatt W
output voltage Vo volt V
6peak current Ipeak ampere A
6peak voltage V peak volt V
7phase angle Φ radian rad
67Planck’s constant h joule second Js
7polarising angle
(Brewster’s angle)
ipdegree ̊
power (of a lens) P dioptre D
power gain Pgain - -
7Power per unit areaWatts per square metreWm-2
primary current Ip ampere A
primary voltage Vpvolt V
7radial acceleration ar metre per second per second m s-2
6redshiftz--
67refractive index n - -
6relativistic lengthl'metrem
6relativistic timet'seconds
rest mass mo kilogram kg
6rest wavelengthλrestmetrem
6root mean square current I rmsampere A
6root mean square voltage Vrmsvolt V
7rotational kinetic energy Erotjoule J
7schwarzchild radiusrSchwarzchildmetrem
secondary current Is ampere A
secondary voltage Vsvolt V
7self-inductance L henry H
67slit separation d metre m
7tangential acceleration atmetre per second per second m s-2
6threshold frequency fohertz Hz
7time constanttseconds
7torque Τ newton metre Nm
7uncertainty in Energy∆E jouleJ
7uncertainty in momentum∆px kilogram metre per second kgms-1
7uncertainty in position∆x metre m
7uncertainty in time∆t seconds
6velocity of observer vometre per second m s-1
6velocity of source vsmetre per second m s-1
voltage gain - - -
voltage gain Ao or V gain - -
567wavelengthλmetrem
6work functionWjouleJ

 

Revision Plan

28/02/18. If you’re stuck inside- DON’T go on your X-boxes, PS4 or whatever the latest number try doing some timed papers.

To the student’s sister who needs the Quantity, Units, Symbols etc .I’ve uploaded the old pre-CfE version and you can just add the additional few. Check out Int1-AH many are relevant. Missing would be t’, l’ etc.

quantity symbol sheet 

If there is a snow day tomorrow, use the time to look at the EMF material and the test will be as soon as we get back.

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This is a ten week revision plan, put together by Mr A Riddell from “up North”. It will give you some ideas on how to break up the daunting task of revision. You don’t have to complete this in the same order, but it does give an indication of how much you need to cover in one week.

Study Plan Higher Physics word

Study Plan Higher Physics pdf

 

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Tips!

Here I will post a few tips and hints to remember when answering SQA Higher Papers, hopefully they’ll be quick, snappy and memorable. You’ve got the whole of the Scottish Physics Teachers’ Community Wisdom Below!

  1. How to remember Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (spell the whole lot not CMBR, as this isn’t a name) However, the way to remember CuMBRia.
  2. Conservation of Momentum IN THE ABSENCE OF EXTERNAL FORCES, MOMENTUM BEFORE THE COLLISION IS EQUAL TO THE MOMENTUM AFTER THE COLLISION.
  3. Obviously you know- no secs in Physics, just stick to unit symbols and save all the problems of spelling.
  4. Fundamental Particles: Key point: it is not that they can be used to make bigger ‘things’, but rather that they are not made from smaller things.
  5. Strong force (associated with the gluon) acts over a very short distance.
  6. The gravitational force extends over very large/infinite distances.
  7. Neutrons don’t carry/have (net) charge so cannot be accelerated/guided/ deflected by magnetic fields.
  8. Remember: SIG FIG, your final answer should be rounded up to the same number of significant figures as the LEAST significant measurement.
  9. Don’t forget to revise your uncertainties.
  10. Make sure you see the words “end of question paper”. Don’t assume you’ve got to the end and there are no questions on the very last page!
  11. “Show” questions – means show correct formula, working and numerical answer stated as given in the question.
  12. Don’t leave anything blank! If you really don’t know, give it a go – you never know.
  13. The questions in the exam sections (MC and then extended answers) are in approximately the same order as the equation sheet.
  14. LIST: given numbers with the correct symbols before doing a calculation. Or as we say IESSUU (information, Equation, Substitution, Solution, Units and Underline)
  15. Substitute then rearrange.
  16. Read all of the question, especially that bit you skipped over at the start.
  17. Don’t forget units! It’s now worth at least 33% of a calculation!
  18. This will do for now more to come as they arise……Check out the past paper marking instructions for do’s and  don’ts- its full of them in that second column!

Here are some top tips for Revision from Mr Dawson from Wallace Hall Academy- thanks

H Revision Pupil Questions pdf version

H Revision Pupil Questions word version

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Uncertainties

New for 2022 KNOWLEDGE ORGANISERS

Teamwork by Mr Stewart (Berwickshire HS) and I. He designed and made them and I tweaked them. Thanks Mr Stewart they’re ace!

Contains UPSN, OEQ, Uncertainties and is 4 pages

It is really important that you get to grips with the uncertainty section. You will need this information for your Assignment and it could well form a question on the exam paper.

The key is remembering that ANY measurement is liable to uncertainty. Get that and you’re half way there!

Here is a summary of Key Knowledge for this section new for 2021

CONTENT ASSOCIATED WITH UNCERTAINTIES

Random and systematic uncertainty

Uncertainties and data analysis

  • All measurements of physical quantities are liable to uncertainty, which should be expressed in absolute or percentage form. Random uncertainties occur when an experiment is repeated and slight variations occur. Scale reading uncertainty is a measure of how well an instrument scale can be read. Random uncertainties can be reduced by taking repeated measurements. Systematic uncertainties occur when readings taken are either all too small or all too large.
  • They can arise due to measurement techniques or experimental design.
  • The mean of a set of readings is the best estimate of a ‘true’ value of the quantity being measured. When systematic uncertainties are present, the mean value of measurements will be offset. When mean values are used, the approximate random uncertainty should be calculated. When an experiment is being undertaken and more than one physical quantity is measured, the quantity with the largest percentage uncertainty should be identified and this may often be used as a good estimate of the percentage uncertainty in the final numerical result of an experiment. The numerical result of an experiment should be expressed in the form final value ±uncertainty.

UNCERTAINTIES NOTES

Whenever you do an experiment there will be uncertainties.

There are three types of uncertainty and effects to look out for at Higher.

Systematic Effects

Here the problem lies with the design of the experiment or apparatus. It includes zero errors. Sometimes they show up when you plot a graph but they are not easy to recognise, as they are not deliberate. Systematic effects include slow running clocks, zero errors, warped metre sticks etc. The best way to ensure that these are spotted is to acknowledge their existence and go looking for them. Where accuracy is of the utmost importance, the apparatus would be calibrated against a known standard. Note that a systematic effect might also be present if the experimenter is making the same mistake each time in taking a reading.

Random Uncertainties

These uncertainties cannot be eliminated. They cannot be pinpointed. examples include fluctuating temperatures, pressure and friction. Their effect can be reduced by taking several readings and finding a mean.

Reading Uncertainties

These occur because we cannot be absolutely certain about our readings when taking measurements from scales. Use scales with mirrors where possible, good scales and repeat all measurements.

Repeat all experiments to reduce the reading and random uncertainties. Systematic effects are not improved by taking lots of results.

Which experiment has the best design?

Quantifying Uncertainties

 1.Find the mean

This is the best estimate of the “true” value but not necessary the “true” value.

          2. Find the approximate random uncertainty in the mean (absolute uncertainty)

This can be written as  and it is sometimes referred to as average deviation or absolute uncertainty.

3. Find the percentage uncertainty.

or

Scale Reading Uncertainty

This value indicates how well an instrument scale can be read.

An estimate of reading uncertainty for an analogue scale is generally taken as:

± half the least division of the scale.

Note: for widely spaced scales, this can be a little pessimistic and a reasonable estimate should be made.

For a digital scale it is taken as

± 1 in the least significant digit displayed.

Or uncertainty in reading ÷reading × 100%

Overall final Uncertainty

When comparing uncertainties, it is important to take the percentage in each.

In an experiment, where more than one physical quantity has been measured, spot the quantity with the largest percentage uncertainty. This percentage uncertainty is often a good estimate of the percentage uncertainty in the final numerical result of the experiment.

eg if one measurement has an uncertainty of 3% and another has an uncertainty of 5%, then the overall percentage uncertainty in this experiment should be taken as 5%

 

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Mrs Physics

January 2022